Cracking the Code: Breaking Down Today’s Slang

I am an “Elder Millennial, or Xennial.

Recently I heard the term “Geriatric Millennial”, which stung a bit. However, my years of wisdom and life experience have included a litany of slang words and phrases introduced to my vocabulary since the 80’s – some of which I still use to this day.

As a mother, I have the opportunity to incorporate not only my historical way of speaking but also to insert the newest and coolest way to communicate with my offspring. The younger ones find it hilarious and fun.

The girls on the cusp of becoming teenagers? Let’s just say that it must be innate in a tween girl to be embarrassed by her humiliating parent who sprinkles in the most current slang into everyday conversation.

In short? My time has come.

For those parents who need translation for what sounds like a spin-off of the English language or might be looking to spice up your discussions with today’s hottest ways to express yourself, buckle up!

Here is a rundown of some of the trendiest slang words for 2021 that your kiddos may use (and so can you!):

 

 

Cracking the Code: Breaking Down Today's Slang

Flex

Forget bending your bicep to show strength. This word conjures up an image of someone metaphorically showing their accomplishments or strength(s). It can mean boasting or explaining how something you did went well for you and/or others.

Example: “I have to flex on my friend’s ability to get her kids to go to sleep at night. I have no idea how she does it.”

Sus

This is simply a shortening of the word suspicious. It can apply when something seems just off or not right to the speaker.

Example: “The kids are quiet, too quiet. Seems sus, am I right?”

Glow Up

You know when you see someone from high school and while they looked pretty good back then, they look gooooood now that it’s been a few years? Maybe they have even transformed? That’s what “glow up” means. They grew up and in the meantime, they had a tremendous Glow Up.

On social media, sometimes users will post a picture of themselves or someone else from the past and then a current photo that shows the person has found their own sense of style, braces off–you know the drill.

Example: “Did you see that Instagram post Jane did on her husband the other day? That man had the ultimate Glow Up since high school. Dang!”

Salty

This basically means that someone is bitter or upset about something.

Example: “I ran into my sister at the store and she was salty over how I organized Mom’s birthday party.”

Receipts

When you want someone to be held accountable or provide proof, you ask for “receipts.” This would be either an eyewitness account of something or even a digital copy to verify someone’s account of something like photos or screenshots.

Example: “So you’re telling me you were at the library all night on Saturday? I’d like to see some receipts. Oh, you sent me Snapchats from the study area? Yep, I see them now. All right, thank you.”

No Cap

In short, this means seriously or that you’re telling the truth. Its origin makes sense: it is in reference to decorative gold teeth of which there are two types: permanent (aka “perms”) or caps (aka “pullouts”). Caps can be pulled out with ease, which could appear fake or not real. But perms are exactly what they sound like, they are permanent and therefore, authentic or real.

Example: “Thanks, Mom for dinner. That was delicious, no cap!”

Slaps

According to Merriam-Webster, to slap is to “strike sharply with or as if with the open hand.” These days, that word is casually used to describe anything that strikes someone as impressive or enjoyable.

Example: “Did you hear about that new family-friendly restaurant? Their kids menu totally slaps.”

G.O.A.T.

This one is easy: it’s an acronym for “Greatest Of All Time”. This is a commonly used word in sports and isn’t new to 2021. If you didn’t know what it meant before, now you do.

Example: “When it comes to baby bottles, I still contend that Avent is the G.O.A.T.”

Stan

If you Stan someone or something, you are obsessed with it. Remember the Eminem 2000 hit Stan? The music video shows an overzealous fan (portrayed by Devon Sawa).

Example: “My kid is such a Stan for Blimpie. I think I’m going to lose my mind. On the bright side, at least it’s not Caillou.”

Yeet

Urban Dictionary defines Yeet as discarding an item at a high velocity. Basically, throwing something hard.

Example: “Sorry kids, no cereal for breakfast. I yeeted the milk this morning – it was expired.”

Bussin

This word describes something as so incredibly good or super good. Typically used to describe food. If someone uses the word twice in a row, then the item was twice as good.

Example: “Those dino nuggets were bussin, bussin!”

The younger crowd like toddlers or some school-aged kiddos may not be as up to speed with today’s slang or current teen language. But those who are more fluent will certainly turn their heads if or when you speak up with some of these colorful options.

By adding in some of the lingo from the ’80s, ’90s or even early 2000s, the varieties and combinations are endless and could result in some fantastic entertainment for both speakers and observers alike. Enjoy!

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Christa lives in Fairfax but spent her formative years in Seattle, WA and Dubuque, IA. She is living out her dream of motherhood in a house full of 5 amazing girls (ages ranging from toddler to 5th grader) that she shares with her wonderful husband as well as several rescue pets. Christa is also a proud working mom who juggles the family's needs while also maintaining a full-time career. Her favorite activities are cooking, coaching, writing, recreational sports, and finding creative ways to build memories with her family.

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